Amarillo Linux Users Group

Meeting Information   •    IRC & XChat Howto   •    IRC   •    Stuff To Wear   •    RSS
User Info
 
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Search


Who's Online
Dot Online Guests : 2
Dot Online Users : 0
Dot Hidden Users : 0
Dot Total Users : 2

Pages: [1]
Print
Author Topic: CentOS  (Read 1654 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
exit2600x
Guest
« on: January 30, 2008, 09:02:28 am »

I'm workin on a CentOS presentation.  Does this need to be saved for next meeting or posted here?

Any other red hat based distros that anyone wants me to cover sometime in the future?

Logged
Marty
Administrator
Addicted to ALUG
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1284


The Real Slim Shady


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2008, 11:01:21 am »

This would be good for the next meeting! Then post it here too.
Logged

-Marty

whatis sex
sex: nothing appropriate.
Philomath
Members
New to ALUG
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 64



View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2008, 02:43:58 pm »

Is puppy?
Logged

"The internet is a communications tool used the world over, where people can come together to bitch about movies and share pornography with one another."
exit2600x
Guest
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2008, 03:06:57 pm »

puppy is debian based, although, it is a good distro
Logged
LeeCrites
New to ALUG
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 57



View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2012, 01:00:49 pm »

I realize this is an old thread, but just in case you still have something out there, I'd be interested in your thoughts on CentOS.

I have installed it on my main system. I have noticed some things I'm not really happy with, but I'm working through them.

The main thing I've noticed is that when you are sysadmin of a CentOS system, you are truly an admin. You have to know how to do things that Ubuntu kind of hides from us.

I have non-computer folks who are keeping their Ubuntu systems running just fine. At least they will until we have to upgrade from 10.10 to whatever version I don't hate -- I am leaning towards Linux Mint. So much of the administrative tasks are simply automated or simplified to the point that non-geeks can happily handle them.

I don't find, for instance, a GUI interface for updating and adding software. It's done at the command line using yum. Don't get me wrong, yum is a good application. But I can't train a non-geek to use it in minutes like I can Synaptic.

Lee
Logged
LeeCrites
New to ALUG
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 57



View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2012, 04:10:57 pm »

Since I "resurrected" this, I thought I'd toss some notes from my installation process here, just FYI.

First, a little about what I installed: I downloaded the x86_64 version of CentOS 6.2. I did the install from the livecd, and went almost instantly into the KDE manager. This is the kind of environment that I am seeing most of the "real" Linux System Administration jobs seem to be going. Since I am doing this to mimic that need, I'm focusing on that.

The thing I noticed up front is that of ALL of the distros I tinkered with, RedHat and CentOS were the only ones that did not automagically understand the NTFS file system(s) I have on my system. I dual-boot, and want to keep my Documents and Music files available to both sides -- so since windoze cannot handle ext4, my only option is to put them on that side and point Linux to it.

In order to get NTFS working, I had to:

1) Get ELrepo and RPMforge working. Instructions are at:
-- http://elrepo.org/tiki/tiki-index.php
-- http://wiki.centos.org/AdditionalResources/Repositories/RPMForge

2)  (as root) so the following:
yum install ntfs-3g
yum install fuse-ntfs-3g
yum install ntfsprogs
yum install findntfs

3) The steps I found on the Internet (which were based on v5.x) go on to say you have to add entries to the fstab file, but I went into the "Disk Utility" (start / Utilities / Disk Utility) and used the GUI to mount them. They became subdirectories of /media (just like Ubuntu), but that was okay for me.

Problem #1 resolved. I have full access to all of the data on the NTFS drives.
Logged
LeeCrites
New to ALUG
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 57



View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2012, 04:26:29 pm »

I don't know why problem #2 was my music files. The "default" installation didn't handle the MP3 files at all. I don't know why this was a shocker, they aren't with Ubuntu, either.

Here is where the first blatantly obvious difference between Ubuntu and CentOS because obvious. It didn't take long to realize I needed to install the gstreamer-plugins-bad and -ugly, but where in the world are they?

With Synaptic, doing a search for gstreamer was enough. There they were; a few clicks later, and you're running. With CentOS, you actually have to understand the CLI processes that Synaptic keeps hidden from the users.

As it turned out, it was a lot simpler than I made it.

1) When I couldn't get it working right, I started off by attempting to reinstall everything Rhythmbox related (which took several yum commands):
-- get a list of all of the applications with: yum list \*rhyth\*
-- then go through each one listed, and: yum remove <progname>

2) Reinstall it: yum install rhythmbox.x86_64

I did this because the web site said that it might be a problem with the installation of Rhythmbox. It wasn't, but I didn't know that until I tried to uninstall/reinstall it.

I then just thought I'd take a shot, and did: yum install gstreamer-plugins-ugly, and it worked. So I also did: yum install gstreamer-plugins-bad.

Voila, Rhythmbox is working. Problem #2 solved.
Logged
Marty
Administrator
Addicted to ALUG
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1284


The Real Slim Shady


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2012, 06:14:44 pm »

Hey Lee,
Does Yum not have a way to search? Its been so long since I've used it, I don't honestly remember.
Logged

-Marty

whatis sex
sex: nothing appropriate.
LeeCrites
New to ALUG
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 57



View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2012, 07:03:24 pm »

Yes, yum has a kind of search feature. So: yum find \*libre\* will find all packages that have the term 'libre' in the name.

It is sort of like the search in Synaptic -- a simple string of characters, but without being able to click on the ones you want to process.
Logged
LeeCrites
New to ALUG
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 57



View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: February 16, 2012, 07:07:52 pm »

Here comes a major league groaner: Modifications to GRUB are done manually. There is a CLI utility you can use, but frankly, using vim is a whole lot easier.

Why did I care? Because I installed this on a windoze box, and instead of having an entry that said "Windows 7," I had an entry called "Other" (seriously).

This pulled me into some of the file structure, and it is really sophisticated. The default seems to be a VLM structure. So I assume you can quickly build a host of virtual systems. That is a far ways down the pipeline for me, but still, it was an interesting "discovery."

Once again, another reason why people who want a Linux System Administrator look at people who are CentOS literate differently than they do the ones with Ubuntu. To be a good CentOS SysAdmin, you really have to know what you are doing.

Lee
Logged
LeeCrites
New to ALUG
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 57



View Profile WWW
« Reply #10 on: February 16, 2012, 07:13:56 pm »

This was a no brainer. Setting up my HP printer was really as easy as Ubuntu, perhaps easier. With CentOS, it automagically found my printer, and configured it properly. Of course, we're talking about the same HP printer that Ubuntu configured without a hitch, as well as almost every other Linux distro I tried: RedHat, OpenSUSE, Fedora, etc.

FreeBSD never got it configured, but I have to admit, I never got far enough in my installation to-do list to fritz with it.
Logged
LeeCrites
New to ALUG
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 57



View Profile WWW
« Reply #11 on: February 16, 2012, 09:22:41 pm »

This was the issue that made me dump FreeBSD/PC-BSD.

None of the distros I tested "come to life" working with the wireless network. But all of the ones (except fBSD and company) at least could handle the USB connected hotspot I have. This is how it was with CentOS. It worked out of the box with my USB network.

A couple of searches made it appear like this was going to be non-trivial. Actually, I am finding that this is a known issue, and it really doesn't work. After spending 5 hours searching the internet, downloading and installing packages, and trying various tips-and-tricks -- and then getting the same failed results that previous versions and attempts have experienced, I am going to say that a wireless connection is NOT going to happen at this time.

I would say this is a major fail -- except that this is not really designed for laptops (even though lots of folks try to use it for them). I am working at the most up-to-date version of the code, so I have the issues that come with the leading-edge.

If I was going to load this on my laptop, then I'd have to drop back two major releases, and see if it worked (the problem started in v5.x).
Logged
Pages: [1]
Print
 
Jump to:  


Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines
Mesh design by Bloc | XHTML | CSS |
spam filtering
SimplePortal 2.1.1